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Friday July 30 Cape Cod Fishing Report

Saltwater fishing is in full swing, and the heat of summertime has settled into the Cape & Islands region. 

Bluefin tuna, stripers, bluefish, fluke and bonito are all options right now.

In today's Cape Cod fishing report podcast we cover as much as we can pack into a 32 minute episode!

More...

To listen to the podcast, simply click the play button at the top of this post. We're also working on a written transcription which will be available as soon as possible.


When we spoke with Ryan of My Fishing Cape Cod he was walking his dog through the Beebe Woods conservation area in the town of Falmouth.

This week Ryan fished the Monomoy Shoals with My Fishing Cape Cod member Jeff Campbell. They reported good action with stripers but no big fish.

Ryan was also able to capture some cool new drone and underwater footage of bass in the rips, which he will hopefully share soon on MFCC.

Tomorrow Ryan will head out in search of great white sharks, which he hopes to film using his drone. You can learn all the details by listening to the podcast.


Second in today's podcast lineup is Phil Howarth - owner the Goose Hummock Shop in Orleans, who reports a great run of bluefish inside Cape Cod Bay. 

Billingsgate Shoal, the Path and Wellfleet is also a good area to look for big bluefish right now. In our conversation with Phil he lists his favorite tackle and lures for big blues.

The striped bass scene at Monomoy is probably a little better than Cape Cod Bay right now, but there are bass in the deep water around Billingsgate. Vertical jigging and wire line jigging is a good bet.

Surfcasting along the Outer Cape, Atlantic-side beaches is also starting to produce some fish for Phil and the crew from the Goose.

The nearshore bite for bluefin tuna has been fantastic, and the area east of Chatham has produced both giant and recreational size tuna. There are a lot of sand eels and squid in the water, so trolling bars could be a good idea right now. 

South of Martha's Vineyard captain Phil has heard about wahoo and white marlin being caught. The yellowfin tuna fishing at the canyons has been fantastic.

Triggerfish have also been caught in some lobster traps off Provincetown, so keep your eyes peeled for more "exotic" species showing up in the Cape area.

The Goose also just received a huge shipment of Van Staal reels, which have been hard to come by this year. If you can't get into the store, then you can view their inventory online at > themightyfish.com.


Next in today's podcast is MFCC member Bruno Demir of Cape & Islands Mitsubishi

Currently, Bruno is on the other side of the world, visiting Europe with his family. He was in Istanbul, Turkey when we chatted with him.

Despite being away, Bruno has remained "plugged-in" to the fishing action here on Cape. The fluke fishing according to Bruno is red hot at the shoals of Nantucket.

Out east the bottom fishing with cod and haddock has also been good for Bruno's cousin Eddy. You can read more about this cod and haddock report here inside our forum.

Bruno has also heard about halibut being caught off Nantucket, which is amazing news!

In addition, Bruno has heard about bonito being caught off Nantucket and Martha's Vineyard.

July 30 Cape Cod Fishing Report | Written Transcription

Speaker 1:
Welcome to The My Fishing Cape Cod Podcast. The My Fishing Cape Cod Podcast is your local source for the latest news and information on fishing Cape Cod. Now here's your host, Kevin Collins.

Kevin Collins:
Well, hello and welcome to another edition of The My Fishing Cape Cod Podcast here from myfishingcapecod.com. This is your host, Kevin Collins, back with you for our last July episode of the podcast for 2021. That's right. The lovely month of July on the Cape and Islands is coming to an end and our first week of August is just around the corner next week. Can't believe it, but we're already into August. We've got a great show lined up for you today. It's going to be one of our longer-form podcasts where we're going to have three experts join us and share some fishing information. We're going to be joined off the top of the show by MFCC founder and creator, Ryan Collins. We're next going to be joined by Phil Howarth of the Goose Hummock down in Orleans and, last but not least, Bruno Demir from Cape and Islands Mitsubishi who's going to give us some reports on Nantucket sound.

Kevin Collins:
If you're new to the podcast, welcome. Sure hope you enjoy it. And for those die-hard weekly podcast listeners, if my voice sounds a little bit funky, no, I'm not sick. I don't really know what's going on. I just kind of woke up with a hoarse voice this morning, which is making it sound a little deeper if you will. Probably from all the podcasting I've been doing lately, a little bit of taxation on the old voice so bear with me throughout today's show if I squeak or crack a little bit. So with all that good stuff out of the way, let's dive right into today's show. Well, first up on today's edition of The My Fishing Cape Cod Podcast is our first guest, MFCC founder and creator Ryan Collins, joining us via the phone. And Ryan, how are you on this beautiful Friday?

Ryan Collins:
I'm doing pretty well, Kevin. I'm actually walking the dog with [Lauren 00:00:01:59] over here in the Beebe Woods in Falmouth, which is just a beautiful conservation area. So pretty good day so far.

Kevin Collins:
It seems like a really nice day out there with some decent conditions for folks looking to get out and enjoy the weather. And Ryan, today's going to be our usual kind of longer-form podcast. We're going to have several guests join us throughout today's show. So I just wanted to tell people that we're continuing to mix in the mini podcasts that are Cape Cod regional specific, throughout the Cape and the Islands, but we're also going to make this podcast immediately available to the public and it's going to be one of our longer-form podcasts.

Ryan Collins:
Exactly. A lot of our podcasts this year have been for supporting members of myfishingcapecod.com, but this one we're going to make immediately available to general public. So if this is your first time listening in, I hope you enjoy it. And if you do enjoy it then feel free to check us out over on myfishingcapecod.com and join as a member so you can get access to all of our podcasts as well as everything else that we do.

Kevin Collins:
And we're still running that special Ryan aren't we? Where the first month of the trial membership is still $1? Are we still doing that?

Ryan Collins:
That's the way it's been since I started My Fishing Cape Cod a decade ago. So yes, it's a dollar for your first month, $9.99 per month after that, you can cancel any time with just one click.

Kevin Collins:
Now I know you and I got a chance to catch up with each other on Wednesday. It had been a little bit of time since we caught up in person, and hopefully we're going to get a chance to do some tin boat fishing in Cape Cod Bay as the calendar turns to August this coming week. But I know you got a chance to get out with MFCC member Jeff Campbell on Tuesday, the day before you and I saw each other, and you got a lot of good underwater filming done.

Ryan Collins:
I did. We fished down at the Monomoy Shoals which has crystal clear water. At times the fish will get congregated behind specific rips down there, which makes for a really nice filming opportunity because the fish are more or less remaining stationary. I can drop a camera down on the bottom and captured some really cool footage of these fish on the rips, waiting for bait to get walked over to them. I also got some really cool drone footage of bass in about three or four feet of water, again, holding in the current and feeding on what I think, in hindsight, which I know we'll talk about a little later, peanut bunker. So got some really cool footage that day. Jeff Campbell, if you're listening, I also fished same day with Bob [Snip 00:04:47]. He's another member who was on board. Bob was actually part of a TV episode that filmed this past winter, there on NBC sports.

Ryan Collins:
And I met their good friend Ralph as well. So great opportunity to fish with members. It's a great opportunity for me to get some really cool footage, which I'll be sharing this week on the website. 8:00 AM, once the tide really started pushing, the fish just kind of showed up out of nowhere. We had really good action with stripers and some bluefish up to 26 inches. A lot of fish, but not many big fish, which is the story of the summer as far as what I'm hearing. Of course, there are some fish being [inaudible 00:05:29] keeping the location secret, but it seems like most of the fish I'm hearing about have been on the smaller side. And if you take a look into the commercial striped bass quota, that really says it all, not a heck of a lot of fish being brought in. Good action with small ones, but those bigger fish are being a little difficult, at least for me, to find so far this summer.

Kevin Collins:
You mentioned peanut bunker. That's what seemed like a lot of these fish were feeding on. I'm starting to see some peanut bunker inside Cape Cod Bay down toward the mouth, the east end of the Cape Cod Canal. Are you starting to hear of a more widespread reports of peanut bunker, Ryan?

Ryan Collins:
Well, that's good that you're seeing them up that way. I saw them this past week down off of Harwich. Pretty much the exact opposite end of the Cape from where you've been seeing them, and the ones that I saw were pretty small, like one to two inches.

Kevin Collins:
Same.

Ryan Collins:
So if you're casting towards fish, if you see birds, if you see fish break in, but you're not getting bites, they can be very finicky when they're on this really tiny peanut bunker. Something like a really small Kastmaster or a really small Crippled Herring would probably get the job done, but those fish, as the peanut bunker gets bigger, as the season moves on, the fish will get easier to catch. Right now they can be a little [inaudible 00:06:54] when they're on such small bait. So that's cool that you're seeing them up that way, Kevin. I haven't really heard much about that. I've heard they were in Nantucket Sound. Again, I saw peanut bunker in Nantucket Sound, but it's good you're seeing them up in the Bay too.

Kevin Collins:
Now switching gears to a little bit larger species, we're going to go from one end of the spectrum to the other, pretty much the smallest little fish that you could ever imagine are these tiny little peanut bunker that are juvenile in size and hopefully will grow into a little bit larger bunker, which will make the striped bass a little bit easier to target as you just mentioned, but I know you're getting out tomorrow. Are you going out with Cullen to film some great whites or who you going out with tomorrow?

Ryan Collins:
Josh [Garvy 00:07:34] reached out to me about filming a great white shark trip that he's going to be doing tomorrow for his daughter's birthday present. So they [inaudible 00:07:44] a great white shark tour scheduled with Captain Cullen, and we're going to be departing tomorrow, weather permitting. I'm actually going to be on a buddy boat, so I'll be not on Cullen's boat, but I'll be on a different boat, just kind of following them along. And if things work out, I'm hoping to get some drone footage of great whites and just capture the whole experience. So we'll see how that goes. I know they're saying it might be blowing a little bit as the [inaudible 00:08:11] around, and you really want calm conditions when you're going to view the great whites. If the waters kick up, then you're not going to have good viewing conditions. So we'll see what happens, but I'm very excited to have an opportunity, again, to hopefully film some great white sharks with the drone. So stay tuned. We'll see how that goes.

Kevin Collins:
Ryan, I just wanted to mention the forum real quick as we wrap up our conversation. As you know, this podcast is going to be available to the general public and some folks that may not be initiated to the MFCC forum, but it's a great resource to check in with the forum for canal updates, updates on striped bass inside Cape Cod Bay, Monomoy rip updates, et cetera. It's just a wealth of information for folks that may be uninitiated.

Ryan Collins:
Yes, so I haven't fished...

Kevin Collins:
That may be uninitiated?

Ryan Collins:
Yeah, so I haven't fished the canal this past week, but there are people inside the forum who have been posting updates almost on a daily basis about how things are going down there, and same for other areas around the Cape. And especially with tuna, there's a good thread going on in there about folks just sharing what they're seeing out there tuna fishing. And then of course, the next few weeks here, the albies are going to show up, and last year and the year before we had some tremendous daily albie updates being shared inside the forum.

Ryan Collins:
The way we do it, it's not like you're going to get a bunch of secret honey holes by logging in there. But what you are going to get are just nice, reliable updates that give you good clues, good hints about places to go and where the fish are. So that's pretty much how that works. So if you're looking for some more updates, definitely log into the forum, and thank you so much to all the members who have been generously sharing their reports and updates all season long. I really appreciate it.

Kevin Collins:
All right, Ryan, I'll let you continue your walk with Rosie and Lauren and we'll let you go and hopefully catch up with you next week.

Ryan Collins:
Sounds good, Kevin, thank you so much.

Kevin Collins:
Well, Next up on today's edition of the My Fishing Cape Cod podcast is our good friend Phil Howarth from down at the Goose Hummock shop in beautiful Orleans, Massachusetts. Phil, how are you on this beautiful Friday?

Phil:
Absolutely beautiful Friday. Sun's out, kind of calm before the storm, it could be a bit crappy tomorrow, but a beautiful day, Kevin. Beautiful day, and the fishing is fantastic right now.

Ryan Collins:
So let's dive right into the fishing, Phil. What are you hearing? Let's start with striped bass and bluefish.

Phil:
Okay. bluefish, we've had the best run in years, which is great. Cape Cod Bay is full of them, so you've got a chance of getting them off the jetties. So places like Sesuit Jetty or Pamet Jetty, Rock Harbor jetty, you might get a chance of getting bluefish from the shore, which is fantastic. On the boat scene, Billingsgate's awash with them. So people are catching blues, and some good size ones. Off Wellfleet in the path there, there's some really good size fish. And they're on the outer Cape as well. People are catching them in the Rips, people are catching them in Pleasant Bay, we've had a few out of Town Cove as well. So bluefish generally everywhere.

Phil:
And the striped bass scene, off Monomoy's fishing really well, especially in the morning, first thing in the morning. So the early bird catches the fish. Cape Cod Bay, it's slowed down a bit because the water temperature is getting warm. If you do get deep with wire line jigging or even the mojo and vertical jigging in deeper water, north side of Billingsgate, I was talking to Captain Brett on the Hindsight and you know, he's getting plenty. You've just got to work a little bit harder and be in the deeper water for them right now. The site fishing on the flats is drying up a little bit, which is a shame, but it kind of happens everywhere at this time of year.

Ryan Collins:
Phil, I want to back up to the bluefish for just one second. I tease a lot of guys that own bait and tackle shops and say bluefish are a bait and tackle shop owner's best friend, because they can really get into your gear, chew it up, you can lose a lot of gear fishing for bluefish. I know some of your customers, like you just mentioned, are targeting these big gator blues inside Cape Cod Bay. What are they using to catch these fish on?

Phil:
Good question. I mean, obviously I'd like to say, use soft plastic.

Ryan Collins:
Yeah.

Phil:
But that's good for business, and you know, I do, because sometimes they're the best way of catching it.

Ryan Collins:
Sure.

Phil:
Obviously every fish costs you a re-tie [inaudible 00:12:50]. But what I do encourage my customers, especially for my customers that aren't overly experienced, because you've got to remember a gator bluefish can take your finger clean off if you put it in its mouth.

Ryan Collins:
Yep.

Phil:
So I like the longer lures with the tubes on. So things like the Hopkins, the Kastmasters with a single hook on, because they have a long piece of plastic on, or the longer Deadly Dicks, because there's less chance of the bluefish actually fighting above the lure. I do encourage people to fish fluorocarbon rather than wire. And what I'll do is I'll fish at 60 pound test fluorocarbon, and yes, I will lose lures, but also... It lessens the chances because they'll take some of the chafe off of blue, but more importantly, if you fish wire, there's a very slim chance you'll catch a striped bass. Whereas if you fish fluoro, you still leave your options open for bass if they're around.

Phil:
But yeah, just, just be sensible and use a fish grip and a set of pliers and de-hook it. Don't put your fingers anywhere near the mouth. Being English, I love the taste of them, Kevin.

Ryan Collins:
Yeah.

Phil:
You've got to gut them, you've got bleed them. Well, you bleed them first, then you've got to gut them, then you've got to keep them on ice. And if you've got a Traeger or a Green Egg or Smoker, they're absolutely glorious. You've just got to cook them right. But they are beautiful.

Ryan Collins:
Yep. I know our good buddy Ryan, my cousin, he loves smoked bluefish. He's gotten into that big time I think since meeting you and picking up that tip, and I know his beautiful wife also makes a really mean bluefish paté. So I know it's really kind of coming around here on Cape Cod.

Phil:
That's right, yeah. Lauren and my wife Jan swapped recipes on that. The smoked bluefish paté is absolutely stunning. We eat it all winter. It's great.

Ryan Collins:
Phil, getting back to the stripers real quick. North of Billingsgate Shoal, I know you're talking to Captain Brett aboard the Hindsight and when he's on the vertical jig, can you give us some pointers? I know there's a lot of folks that listen to the website that are predominantly shore fishermen, but that do get the opportunity go out on a boat from time to time. Probably not too familiar with the vertical jig in that deeper water for striped bass. So can you give us some tips on gear and technique at all?

Phil:
Yeah. I'm a big fan of the simple over jig, because there's a lot of sand eels around this year which again, there haven't been this year, which we'll come on to that in a minute on the tuna bit. But sand eels, the over jig is a simple diamond jig with a green tube on it. We redesigned it a few years ago and put a much better hook on it so it's got a solid hook on it and the technique is to bounce the jig as you're reeling, all the way to the bottom. Dance it, basically. Make the jig dance on the way up. Daddy Mac does a really good jig. Some of the Nomad Design streakers are done well as well. It's a low profile jig that really emulates a sand eel very well. So it's those smaller, lower profile jigs that have done really well.

Ryan Collins:
One other thing I wanted to ask you about Phil was just, are you hearing about anybody using live eels at night to get them inside Cape Cod Bay?

Phil:
Yeah, that hasn't been a big bite this year. Live [inaudible 00:16:06] has worked really well, especially on the outside, down off the Outer Cape beaches. Live mackerel obvious has worked really well off the race, but we haven't sold tons of eels this year. But it's a traditional and very deadly way of fishing at night for them.

Phil:
What's really worth mentioning to this report is that the outer beaches have just started to fish last week or so. My guy's been getting into them and I love that. Being able to fish out on one of the outer Atlantic beaches for striped bass, and there's been the big needlefish. Eels obviously work. Needlefish and the big plugs and also fishing sub-surface with things like the Savage sand eel and stuff like that.

Ryan Collins:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Phil:
So that's kind of like, screws my August, really, because I'm fishing for tuna in the morning and I'm fishing for a striped bass off the beach at night. So it's kind of I end up with sleep deprivation by September.

Ryan Collins:
And as you mentioned, we're headed into August. The last few days of July are this weekend. We're going to be in our first week of August next week. And you mentioned the sand eels, Phil. So I'd be remiss if I didn't ask you about the offshore report, what's going on with the tuna.

Phil:
Yeah. The near shore bite for tuna is fantastic right now. You know, east of Chatham has been absolutely rampant. You can see that the quota is almost full commercially. A lot of big fish around. But east of Chatham in the last couple of days, smaller fish have been bouncing on top. So the recreational fish have followed the sand eels up. The sand eels for the last few years have stayed down off Rhode Island and New York, and that's kept the smaller fish south. So whilst we've had a brilliant big fish fishery, the small fishing has sucked. This year there's going to be a big change and I had one of my guys, he had fish on a bar a couple of days-

Phil:
Right. One of my guys see how he had fish on a bar, a couple of days ago. He's to Chatham, he's just on Crab Ledge. So, the bar by the sandhills is there. There's a lot of squid in the water still. So, yeah, the smaller fish are coming this year. So, the recreational anglers, kind of have a great opportunity to catch small fish. And, I also think that, you know, there's a better opportunity for a bar bite, which is really exhilarating. And, also, to run-and-gun, and actually catch loads of these smaller fish. I have a real blast catching these. You have 50, 60, 65-inch fish, on spinning gear, which is really, really accelerating stuff. I love it. And, yeah, that's east of Chatham. [Sotheby 00:18:41] Islands was really strong early. I was at a place called the Claw. That bite's quieting down a bit, and it's more the traditional in the dump.

Phil:
And, I'm even hearing, on the Southern end of the [Down Dump 00:18:53], people catching wahoo now.

Kevin Collins:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Phil:
As that warmer water is actually pushed in. So you can actually get into the exotics. There's white marlin being caught, south of Martha's Vineyard, as well. So, you've got some opportunity to just get some, you know, classic kind canyon fish.

Kevin Collins:
Yup.

Phil:
But, actually catch them in relatively near shore. But, the canyons has been absolutely phenomenal. I was a oceanographer last week with a friend of mine on his boat, and we lost gaps with the yellow fin we'd caught. And, the biggest one was, you know, just on our website. We caught one about 1800 pounds, which is a quite stout yellow for up here. And, we found, on the way in, we found bluefin, and we cast a bluefin, and we had, you know... We brought two 50-plus inch fish to the boat, you know, release one, kept one. So, we did great.

Kevin Collins:
So, you had some fresh bluefin tuna meat.

Phil:
Oh, yeah. We were having bluefin, yellow fin, and every other fin this weekend, you know. So, me and all my staff, and quite a few of my customers, ate well this weekend on the back of that trip. So, Rick and I would carve up. It took us three hours to actually filet all up, and, it is lovely to [distribute it 00:20:04]. It think it's really nice, and it's part of the fun of catching it, is being able to give it to friends.

Kevin Collins:
Yeah.

Phil:
So, we were doing that. I'm also hearing, you know, wither I am talking about exotics, I'm hearing reports of people catching trigger fish. And trigger fish being caught in the lobster traps, off peak time right now. So, there's some really interesting waters around, and I captured [Bobby Rice 00:20:25] last year. Had a couple of marlin off Stellwagen. You know, I think this year we're going to see it again, as the water continues to warm up in August, we're going to find ourselves getting more exotics, which is kind of really... Yeah, it's going to be really hilarious watching guys trolling for bluefin on Stellwagen, and seeing a marlin jump. It's really cool. Not sure what it says for global warming, but it's good for the fishing in that respect.

Kevin Collins:
It sure is.

Kevin Collins:
And, Phil, the last thing I want to ask you about is just the store. I'm sure you guys have been slammed throughout the month of July. Anything special going on at the store?

Phil:
Yeah, the store... And, obviously, yeah, we're very busy, which is great. A lot of people coming in. I've got another big [Bite 00:21:03] delivery group coming in next week, so I'm going to have boats again. As you know, there's been an ongoing shortage.

Phil:
My exciting news, that we just posted on the Gram yesterday. I just had 130 something Van Staal reels. Van Staal is a wonderful brand for the shore fishing, especially, due to the water resistant capabilities. And Van Staal has been like hen's teeth this year, nobody's got any. So, to get a 100 plus of those in stock, has encouraged people to come down and have a look at the selection. But, were well-stocked in both. We just had a big fly order in. So, if anybody's fly time, we just put in 5,500 items of fly fishing tying equipment. So, we've got a lot of stuff, Kevin, yes. So, ask me, and please come on down, have a look. And of course, Jake says, "If you don't get in the store, go to the mightyfish.com, and we've got most of the store online now."

Kevin Collins:
And the other beautiful part about the Mighty Fish is free shipping, Phil, which is a huge deal on all orders over 75 bucks. So that's a great, you know, perk to fishing online these days.

Phil:
Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. If you can't get it in the store, you know, come online, and if you're not quite sure what you want to buy, and you're remote, please phone the store and speak to one of my experts. We'll happily talk you through it, and we can take an order over the phone, or you can then choose it from the Mighty Fish. So, we're happily to do, you know... We're happy to talk and advise people as well, Kevin.

Kevin Collins:
All right, Phil, thank you for taking the time to give us such a detailed report on this beautiful Friday. And, also, just being a great resource for the Cape Cod fishing community in general. And I look forward to catching up with you again soon, hopefully.

Phil:
Yeah, and you. All right. All the best. Have a lovely weekend, Kevin.

Kevin Collins:
Well, next up on today's edition to the My Fishing Cape Cod Podcast, we're going to take a trip around the world to check in with our good buddy Bruno Demir from Capon Islands, Mitsubishi. And, Bruno is usually checking in either from the dealership, or maybe the deck of his boat, the Gaviota, somewhere out in Nantucket Sound somewhere. But, we have a very special appearance by Bruno today. He is coming to us live from his native Turkey, Istanbul, Turkey. And, Bruno, how are you, and can you hear me?

Bruno Demir:
Yeah. I can hear you loud and clear. Hello MFCC members. And, yes, I am on the other side of the world.

Kevin Collins:
Pretty amazing what technology can do. It's brought us together for this podcast. You sound great. You sound like you're right next to me here in my little home studio setup, but how has the trip Ben Bruno? You've been away for the better part of two weeks. Give us a quick recap, some of the highlights.

Bruno Demir:
Yeah. You know, we headed out here. We stopped in France. We checked out Paris, and went to the Louvre, saw the Mona Lisa in person. I ended up going to Disney land in Paris. Then we ended up in the Riviera of Turkey, on the Mediterranean, which I was fantastic. It's like 30 feet of water, crystal clear, and you could see the bottom of it, and you can swim in there with no problems. There's no sharks like in Cape Cod, or jellyfish that could sting you, or anything that can hurt you. So, it's beautiful. We did some of that. And now we're here in the big city, 25 million strong, in Istanbul, Turkey. And we're getting ready to board a flight tomorrow, and head back to home turf, the great United States.

Kevin Collins:
And Bruno, I know you've very plugged in while you've been away. You've been kind of enjoying the time with your family, but at the same time, you know, keeping tabs on what's going on back in the waters off Cape Cod. Give us a quick report on what you've been hearing in terms of stripers, blues. I know fluke is something you're looking forward to. Give us a taste of what you've been hearing from your guys back.

Bruno Demir:
You know, it's... As much as the vacation has been great, the guys are just teasing me and torturing me with what's going on back home that I can't be a part of. But, so I got some boots on the ground, and luckily I have a pretty good network of guys out on the Cape that always tell me what's going on. But, I can tell you right now, the fluke fishing is red hot down at the shoals in Nantucket. You don't even have to really go very far. You see some fluke right inside big round and little round shoal. So, that's pretty good right now.

Bruno Demir:
I know my cousin Eddie's gone east, and he's done pretty well with bottom fishing with haddock and cod. And, if you guys are out there fishing the Sword for tuna fish, I could tell you that to get skunked, drop down a big biking jig with some teasers, and bring some clams with ya. Worst case scenario, you come back with some nice haddock and cod filets.

Bruno Demir:
I was talking to my friends down at the Review Bait and Tackle, and he was telling me that the majority of the bites for tuna, they seen it on Crab Ledge, not so much out at the Sword. The Sword has been kind of hit and miss, and Crab Ledge has been a little more consistent when it comes to bluefin.

Bruno Demir:
And, then, I guess one of the most interesting reports that I got, and there were multiple reports of halibut down in Nantucket. And, I'm going to guess that's somewhere around [inaudible 00:26:59] Shoal area, but I've heard of a hundred pound halibut.

Bruno Demir:
[inaudible 00:27:00] But I've heard of a hundred pound halibut and an 85 pound halibut, brought home off Nantucket. So, that was very, very interesting for me to find out, and the 85 pound halibut was actually caught on 20 pound test line.

Kevin Collins:
Uh-huh (affirmative).

Bruno Demir:
Which is normally what I would use for fluke.

Kevin Collins:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Bruno Demir:
So, that was extremely interesting, and I didn't see that one coming, but very nice to hear that that fishery might someday come back, and we'll be able to target those guys.

Kevin Collins:
Yeah, I know you and I Bruno, we talk a lot about eating. We love to prepare our catches in various different ways. Halibut, great eating fish.

Bruno Demir:
Yeah absolutely, I agree 100%. One of my favorites.

Kevin Collins:
If you were out there, and you're going to be out there, the first couple weeks of August here, don't you have your group trip giveaway with cousin Eddie coming up to go fluking soon?

Bruno Demir:
That's right. So, soon as I get back on home turf, we got a Fluke trip heading down to Nantucket for our giveaway winners. Where we were able to raise $2,600 for Boston children's hospital. Again, thank you for everyone donating and helping out with that. And that'll be the first trip we make, is down to Nantucket, and try to see if we can land a trophy fish for one of these guys. The fluking is good, but I had my first reports come in for a bonito...

Kevin Collins:
oh.

Bruno Demir:
... off of Nantucket and Martha's vineyard. So, the first reports of bonito are coming in, and usually it goes with bonito. Then you start seeing your halibuts. So, that's very exciting to me. That's one of my favorite fisheries next to a fluking. So, I think right after that fluke trip, my next focus is going to be heading down to the Hooter, and seeing if we can get some funny fish on the boat.

Kevin Collins:
And Bruno, are you still hearing from your sources that there are just a lot of sublegal striped bass around? It just seems like that's kind of the vibe that I'm getting from most of my moles out there. There's some big fish swimming through the canal from time to time, but it's been really hard to target the larger fish.

Bruno Demir:
As the water heats up, so it's hard to get those bigger fish stop biting unless you're throwing live eels at them in the middle of the night. But, I would say that your best shot, if you'll look for a bigger striper, is most definitely going to be trying to get down to the bottom. Try to just stick to the bottom, and jigsaw it off the bottom. And that's probably going to be your best bet to get your striper. Other than that, from what I've heard it's been sub legal striper and some fish.

Kevin Collins:
Well, that sounds like a pretty consistent report to what I'm hearing, but I'm really looking forward to getting the live reports from you when you get back home here safely with your beautiful family. I love checking in with you when you're out on the deck of your boat. And have those lobster traps been soaking, the whole time you've been away?

Bruno Demir:
Yeah. This time of the year, you don't usually see some crazy Northeastern or any crazy winds. So, I just left them in. I didn't even bait them, but soon as I get back, I got a bunch of stuff that I could stick in those boxes and drop them back down, and let's see what we come up with. Did you know, typically going into August, it will slow down. And I know that a lot of guys on the forums were trying out lobster fishing and some of them were getting a lot of crabs. But going into August, that's kind of the typical thing, but it will get better as we start getting into the fall. But it's worth just keeping them wet, keeping them baited and even if you get one or two keepers it's nice little [inaudible 00:31:16] here.

Kevin Collins:
All right, Bruno, I'm going to let you go and enjoy the last day of your vacation. And I want to wish you and your family safe passage back here to the States. And can't wait to catch up with you next week when you're back at home.

Bruno Demir:
Tight lines everybody.

Kevin Collins:
My thanks to Bruno Demir from Cape & Islands Mitsubishi, for taking some time out of his family vacation and joining us from halfway around the world in Istanbul, Turkey. And that's going to put the wraps on this week's edition of the My Fishing Cape Cod podcast. And I want to thank all of our guests that joined today's program, starting with MFCC founder and creator, Ryan Collins, Phil Howarth, the owner of The Goose Hummock down in Orleans, and last but not least, Bruno Demir from Cape & Islands Mitsubishi. Sure hope you enjoyed today's podcast, and for those listening for the very first time, welcome. And thank you for giving us a try. Sure hope to interact with you more on My Fishing Cape Cod as we go through the summer and fall fishing season. So thanks everybody for listening and bearing with me throughout my voice difficulties on today's show. And this is your host, Kevin Collins signing off, and until we chat again, tight lines and take care.

Speaker 1:
Thanks for tuning in to the My Fishing Cape Cod podcast. For the latest local news information and fishing reports, be sure to log onto myfishingcapecod.com. From all of us at My Fishing Cape Cod, tight lines and take care.

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